On March 11, 1947 Over 4,000 people showed up to watch Ben Hogan team with one of the nation’s leading polo players Mike Phipps, an 11-handicapper to win the Reed Latham amateur-professional golf tournament

Mike Phipps
Pictured is Ben Hogan, receiving a check from Chris Dunphy, tournament chairman, at the Amateur-Pro tournament at Palm Beach, Florida on March 11, 1947. From left to right are: Hogan, Countess Jose Dorelis, B.L. Taylor, club president, Hogan’s partner Mike Phipps and Dunphy. Hogan and Phipps are holding J. Jay O’Brien Memorial Trophy.

On This Day in Hogan History:

By: Mark Baron

On March 11, 1947 Over 4,000 people showed up to watch Ben Hogan team with one of the nation’s leading polo players Mike Phipps, an 11-handicapper to win the Reed Latham amateur-professional golf tournament at the Seminole Golf Club (an unofficial event on the PGA Tour) with a best-ball score of 63.

A $15,000 prize was at stake for the pros, making the tournament a bit more serious for them while the amateurs kidded and fooled. Chick Harbert of Detroit and George Fazio tied for top money with Hogan and Johnny Bulla tied for second, and Henry G. Picard, Jim Ferrier, and Ellsworth Vines tied for third.

This was Phipps second victory in this event as he teamed with Lloyd Mangrum to win in 1942. Phipps sank putts of 30 and 20 feet on the 16th and 17th holes to aid in the victory.

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Melvin “Chick” Harbert and George Fazio split first and second place money in the pro division with 138 for the 36-hole Tournament. They each received $1,250.00. Claude Harmon, the Seminole Golf Professional finished in third with a score of 141. Johnny Bulla and Hogan tied for fourth.

The Duke of Windsor, Edward VIII with an 18-stroke handicap, shot an 86 for a net score of 68. The Duke teamed with pro E. J. (Dutch) Harrison to beat the Duke of Marlborough and pro Sam Byrd, a former New York Yankee. Windsor and Harrison had a best-ball of 68, while Marlborough and Byrd, with only a seven-stroke handicap had 75. The former king's score left his team five strokes behind Hogan and Phipps.

Hogan was the biggest winner in the event. He was awarded $1,500.00 as Phipps partner, plus $1,700.00 as a percentage on the winning combine in the auction pool, plus $475 for finishing in fourth place in the 36-hole play, for a two day total of $3,675.00, which in 1947 was a sizable amount.

 

About the Author

Mark Baron

Mark Baron is a Ben Hogan expert who posts daily about the legend. Check out Mark's huge following on the Ben Hogan Facebook Page and stay tuned for special Hogan anniversaries for Mark's insight. Check out the page here: www.facebook.com/benhogangolf

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